Driving to Asessippi by Car

From Winnipeg:
Take Highway 1 West from Winnipeg past Portage la Prairie 96.8 km, (approximately 1 hour 10 minutes).
Turn North on Highway 16 to Minnedosa 116 km, (approximately 1 hour 12 minutes).
Take 16a North to Junction of Highway 16 and 10   5.5 km, (approximately 4 minutes).
Continue on Highway 16 West to Highway 83 North 129 km, (about 1 hour 19 minutes).
Take Highway 83 North to Highway 482 20.2 km, (approximately 16 minutes).
Turn West on 482 2.3 km (approximately 3 minutes).
Turn North onto Asessippi Avenue, follow the signs to Asessippi.

From Brandon:
Take Highway 10 North from Brandon to Highway 16 junction outside of Minnedosa  56.6 km (approximately 41 minutes).
Continue on Highway 16 West to Highway 83 North 129 km, (about 1 hour 19 minutes).
Take Highway 83 North to Highway 482 20.2 km, (approximately 16 minutes).
Turn West on 482 2.3 km (approximately 3 minutes).
Turn North onto Asessippi Avenue, follow the signs to Asessippi.

From Yorkton (through Russell):
Take Highway 16 East from Yorkton  to Highway 83  100 km (approximately 1 hour).
Take Highway 83 North to Highway 482 20.2 km, (approximately 16 minutes).
Turn West on 482 2.3 km (approximately 3 minutes).
Turn North onto Asessippi Avenue, follow the signs to Asessippi.

From Yorkton (through Roblin)
Take Highway 10 East from Yorkton (this will turn into Highway 5 East once you cross the Manitoba border).
Continue until you reach Roblin junction Highway 83  77.4 km (approximately 52 minutes).
Turn South on Highway 83 to PTH 482 34.7 km (approximately 26 minutes).
Turn West on 482 2.3 km (approximately 3 minutes).
Turn North onto Asessippi Avenue, follow the signs to Asessippi.

Driving Tips

It is highly recommended for winter driving that Snow Tires are used. Transport Canada recommends the use of a winter tire that has been rated for severe snow conditions. These tires have a pictograph of a mountain peak with snowflakes on the side.

Tires marked with the pictograph of a peaked mountain with a snowflake meet specific snow traction performance requirements, and have been designed specifically for use in severe snow conditions.

Tips for the road

Speed limits are for dry conditions. Keep in mind that it can take up to three times as long to stop on snow and ice than it does on dry pavement. Keep at least three times normal distance between you and the car in front.

  • Be extra cautious in the danger zones: intersections, lane changes, turns, stops.
  • In snow, tires barely grab the road, so accelerate, turn and stop gently.
  • Accelerate and brake on straight-aways where possible, gently in either case.
  • If ice and bare patches alternate, brake in the bare spots and coast over the ice. Apply that same rationale to bridges, which freeze before roadways, and try to reach “bridge speed” before you get there.
  • Use your lights on low beam and if you can’t see the edge of the road, use roadside reflectors to guide you.
  • When descending a hill, your maximum safe speed should be at the crest.
  • Four-wheel-drive owners: Even though your system is great for moving around in the snow, it doesn’t help you slow down! Word to the wise: slow down!
  • A word about grader drivers. They’re up when you’re asleep, work in conditions you avoid, and in some places, risk avalanches in order to clear your way to the slopes. So be kind, give the plow plenty of room, and keep your beams low. Above all, be like tortoise and practice patience.